50W Blue grow light build for seeding

According to my research, blue light is primarily used in plants for vegetative growth.  It follows, therefore that blue light is best for seedlings and clones that you want to grow in size quickly.  Is this logic sound?  I’ll experiment, and report back.

This video is a live build video where I make a $54 dollar blue-only grow LED floodlight.  Note that at the time of posting, the floodlight price has already changed on Amazon.  You can typically find these on ebay for a reasonable price.

Materials:

Total Cost: $54

LED Stair Lights


Stairs are pretty boring, but they don’t have to be.  I convinced my loving wife that she needed stair lights.  I put the project off for over 6 months while I’ve been greenhousing, but now that that project is more completed, I have time to get back to house projects.  Let’s get building.

Building

First, we will use the APA102 lights.  These are individually controllable.  They are the same lights we’ve used in our ambilight project with the minnowboard max.

I came up with a simple light protocol that supports “instructions” rather than just raw pixel data so it’s fast and light.  I’ve published the library here on github (be sure to use it with my forked Adafruit_dotstar library which has the “driver” for the LightProtocol).  I loaded that onto a particle photon, combined with an level shifter, and powered the thing with a Drok DC-DC power supply and a 24V 5A AC-DC adapter.

To install the LED strips on the stairs, I picked up several aluminum channels from superbrightleds.com and the corresponding “frosted” covers.  To stick the channels on the stairs, I used 3M automotive double-sided tape.  The aluminum can be drilled and screws can be used to mount, but I didn’t do that.  I used a simple dremel to cut the channels where I needed to.

I’m hiding the photon and the power supply in the closet which is adjacent to the stairs.  I cut a small hole in the wall on the closet side and put a 4 wire, 14AWG cable through the wall.  This is low-voltage (5V), so you don’t need an electrician or a expensive permit to install inside the wall… at least in my area.  On the other side, I combined a 2 socket “keystone” faceplate with a couple two wire speaker jacks.  This doesn’t look half bad.

Effects

Using the same python library as the minnowboard max ambilight project, and adding a “driver” that can speak our “LightProtocol” that we’ve installed on the particle photon, we are able to to complex effects and themes on the desktop and change the lights over wifi.

I have three effects coded up: “Chase”, “Random Rainbow Transforms”, and “Rainbow”.  Check out the video for how these effects look on our lights.  What other cool effects can we do?